The 3D Virtual Booth is live

———— Filed under: Art ⁄⁄ Augmented Reality ⁄⁄ Digital ⁄⁄ Market

Author:
Publ. 05.19.2021

Welcome to the YOUR ART BEAT Virtual Booth. Here you can find our artists, projects and everything about our association with the experience of a virtual room.
The 3D VR Booth is designed by Strollology for Art Karlsruhe with Your Art Beat e.V.

YourArtBeat Virtual Booth

Project management: Teferie Amenu Tafesse with students of the School of Popular Arts Berlin
Design: Anna Roth, Strollology
Coding: Gabor Kovacs, Berlin School of Design and Communication
Supervision: Matthias Welker, YOUR ART BEAT e.V.

Visit our shop and blog, donate and become a member! Enjoy!

Blickwinkel II – by Sophia Vecchini

———— Filed under: Art ⁄⁄ Exhibition ⁄⁄ Market ⁄⁄ photography
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Author:
Publ. 03.25.2021

For her exhibition “Blickwinkel”, Sophia Vecchini let people without shelter become artists, as they were allowed to capture their everyday lives with a disposable camera. Sophia Vecchini conceived an exhibition from the resulting material. “It’s a nice feeling to give people the chance to be seen: with their perspectives, their courage and look at the world.” The exhibition can be summed up as unique, human and inspiring. Why? Read the interview and learn more about the special project “Blickwinkel”. If you haven’t read the first “Blickwinkel” interview with Sophia yet, you can find it here.

We conducted our first interview during the planning phase of your project “Blickwinkel”. Now, a few months later, the time has come and “Blickwinkel” is on display in the Wilmersdorfer Arcaden, a shopping mall since 24 March 2021.

Yes, I am very pleased that the exhibition now also has a second venue, namely the Wilmersdorfer Arcaden. Due to the current Corona measures, the exhibition at the Zentrum am Zoo has been postponed indefinitely for the time being. In the Arcaden, the exhibition is presented in a glass box. That’s great, because despite Corona, the shops are open for everyday needs. That’s why the arcades still have more than 10,000 visitors a day. This is, of course, a great opportunity for “Blickwinkel” to be seen (despite current Corona measures). The artworks are also offered for sale at the YourArtBeat Market. This is very important to me as I want the artists to get a financial reward too. Because they have taken the time and reflected things.

In the last interview you said that you wanted the artists to get money. But you also said that there were voices that said: Yes, but if you give money to people without shelter, they will probably spend it on drugs or alcohol.

That people without shelter always spend their money on drugs or alcohol is a prejudice, and in my project I want every artist to be seen as a human being and not as a person without shelter. Because for me, it is essential to emphasise that one should not approach people without shelter with such generalised prejudices. Moreover, for me and Katrin Lück, who is the patron of “Blickwinkel” and the Equal Opportunities Commissioner for the Wilmersdorf-Charlottenburg district, self-determination is very important. Equality means equal rights for all. We don’t tell anyone else how to deal with their money.

How many artists were you ultimately able to recruit for your project?

There are now four artists left. I distributed 14 disposable cameras. From the beginning, 20 pictures were planned for the exhibition. I achieved this goal, but it was planned that there would be one or two pictures per artist. The problem is that, on the one hand, some were not interested in taking part in such a project. Many women were not interested and I could hear a little bit from the social workers on site that women are a bit more ashamed. It is definitely riskier to live as a woman on the street and there are also many more men among the poor people without shelter. In the end, only six of the 14 cameras came back, but I also expected this because people without shelter are not always found in the same places. And if they were not there at the time the cameras were collected – yes, then that’s it. Others didn’t know how to use the cameras and had given up, which is understandable. I could not use the pictures of two of the cameras. But it is clear that disposable cameras simply do not have one hundred per cent performance as a product. I now have four male artists left and of course I am very happy about that. I have also had real contact with two of them. That means we discussed the pictures together. The two of them are simply great people and I sincerely hope that they will get something out of it financially. Both are very grateful to all the institutions that support them.

Do you know how old the artists are?

The two I have had contact with are 60 and 62 years old. Of the other two I don’t know more than their names.

If you were to describe your exhibition with three adjectives, what would they be?

Unique. Human. Inspiring. Well, I hope that others feel the same way, but I have been very inspired by this project. At least that had been one of my goals. The aim of “Blickwinkel” is to inspire people to think about certain social issues. Especially about urban poverty and homelessness; to open up a bit more, that homelessness is not just a stigma that is stuck in our heads.

The exhibition “Blickwinkel” can be seen until 30 April 2021 at the Wilmersdorfer Arcaden “WILMA” . Please pay attention to the Corona protection measures in force.

Sophia Vecchini wants to thank: Katrin Lück, Equal Opportunities Commissioner in the Wilmersdorf-Charlottenburg district & patron of Blickwinkel; Petra Schönberger; the management and team of the Bahnhofsmission am Zoo and the ZaZ, as well as all the individual case workers and social workers of the Berliner Stadtmission who have supported me; the sponsors of the tax consultancy Freiberger & Collegen; the YOUR ART BEAT Team! (Editors, Market & Virtual Booth).

The interview was conducted by Carsten Jan Weichelt

Behind Your Art Beat – An Interview with Johanna Griebert

———— Filed under: Allgemein ⁄⁄ Art ⁄⁄ Artist ⁄⁄ Digital ⁄⁄ Market ⁄⁄ Processing

Author:
Publ. 03.2.2021

Maybe you can think of [Your Art Beat] as a kind of virtual museum

It is the year 2016. In the beginning it is just an idea, but soon Your Art Beat e. V. grew out of it. Johanna Griebert has been involved from the beginning, and today we will introduce her. Johanna is the chairperson of the board of Your Art Beat, along with Matthias Welker. In the interview, we talk about the history of the association and what Your Art Beat stands for. The aim of the association is “to take a holistic view on the art, culture and creative scene and [to] dedicate itself to the protection, preservation, wide-ranging and multimedia presentation of the most diverse arts”, as Johanna says. The mission: cultural education. The main motif here is the combination of modern media technologies and interfaces of the analogue and digital world. ” Maybe you can think of [Your Art Beat] as a kind of virtual museum,” she pursues. Artists who are selected through open calls are exhibited. Their works can be bought on the Your Art Beat Market. What exactly the YAB Market is all about? What the future of YAB will look like? You can find out in the following interview. Johanna also explains why experimenting with digital media in particular is so exciting and which features should not be missing from a good exhibition.

How did the association Your Art Beat start and what are your tasks there?

I have been involved in Your Art Beat from the very beginning. In 2016, after the presentation of my final project, back then my professor, now good friend and colleague Matthias Welker approached me and described his initial ideas for a project. From the first moment, I was enthusiastic and quickly convinced that I wanted to get involved in the project. That was practically the birth of a project that later developed into Your Art Beat. My tasks were of a conceptual, curatorial, editorial and organisational nature. At the end of 2016, the project was online and half a year later, in the summer of 2017, we founded the YAB association, which I run together with Matthias as chairperson of the board.

How would you describe the association in a few sentences?

Your Art Beat e.V. is a non-profit association that takes a holistic view on the artistic, cultural and creative scene and is dedicated to the protection, preservation and wide-ranging, multimedia presentation of a wide variety of arts. We see our mission in cultural education and in this respect call for participatory events and “creative activism”. We want to conduct discourses at eye level and dissolve static role assignments of knowledge instructor, recipient and producer. “Isn’t everybody a creator and curator?” Furthermore, Your Art Beat explores the potentials of modern media technologies and the intersections of the analogue and the digital. This is a motif that can be found in various facets of Your Art Beat.

What goals have you set yourselves as an association? What does Your Art Beat stand for?

We see our function primarily in promoting artists and supporting them in their activities. To this end, we offer various services, which we put together according to orientation and objectives, in order to be able to respond to individual circumstances and requirements.
Our goal or vision is to develop a new tool (Your Art Beat Gallery), which is to be understood as a kind of immersive and multimedia knowledge repository, in which collectively generated knowledge, artistic experiences or creative processes are saved and designed as multimedia contributions. Perhaps one can imagine it as a kind of virtual museum, composed of content from society and intended to offer participation, information and pleasure at the same time. Like a museum, this collective art and creative memory should be accessible to the public.

What exactly is the Your Art Beat Market?

The YAB Market is a digital trading place dedicated exclusively to the buying and selling of artworks, with a focus on digital and media art. Here we also find “the typical YAB motif” that I spoke of earlier: The intersection of the analogue and the digital.
So the question is: how can you produce a digital work haptically or transfer it into a physical medium?
This primarily goes hand in hand with the challenge that for each work a suitable physical medium has to be found that reflects both the visual dimensional depth and the content component (“the soul” of the work). To this end, we have experimented with different materials, such as mirror glass, (normal) glass and aluminium. This allows us to offer individual products in different design and price variants.
Furthermore, we offer additional services that can be used individually. We offer clients our knowledge and professional background, roughly speaking: content-related, legal, financial, as well as logistical matters concerning private art objects.

How do you select the artists?

Every year we launch an open call in which we look for new and special talents. The 5-10 artists who convinced us the most will be presented at the YAB Market. In addition, a selection of their works is offered for sale. Within 3-4 weeks, artists and creative professionals from all over the world have the opportunity to apply with their portfolio. At the last Open Calls we got great feedback from different countries. The decisions are usually very difficult but the result is always a very meticulous and fine selection of new talents’ works. As I said before, there is a focus on media and digital art. However, in recent years, we have also been able to convince artists from more “classical” disciplines, which means that the Market can offer a refreshing diversity for sale.

Digital media – are they more a part of the independent cultural scene or have they already entered the realm of state institutions?

Digital media have also arrived in institutional exhibition venues, but in practice they are not as mature as one would expect, or wish. Nevertheless, it’s nice to see that the use of digital media is also becoming established in “traditional” or “conservative” institutions. – Of course, it always depends on how the respective exhibition house is set up and oriented. For many exhibitions, media stations etc. are not even necessary, e.g. pure art exhibitions. Either way, anyone who wants to use media in exhibitions should choose them sensibly, plan them carefully and implement them in an overall functional way.
A big challenge that I personally perceive in my job at the moment is the topic of accessibility. Especially when it comes to electronic media, there are a lot of things to consider when implementing digital applications – be it of a design, content or physical nature. It is not easy to reconcile all of these and achieve a beautiful, functional end product. I am very pleased that more attention is being paid to the topic of accessibility in the exhibition context and that it is establishing itself as an elementary component in the exhibition business – yet there is still a lot to learn on all sides.

What makes it so exciting to experiment with digital media?

What is exciting about digital media is that digital formats give us the possibilities to present and convey content in the most diverse ways. In other words, for every content you want to convey, there are different ways of preparing and presenting it. Digital media expand this spectrum and offer us further options for presenting and ultimately conveying content in its own individual and ideal way.

What is planned for Art Karlsruhe, how will YourArtBeat present itself?

We are very pleased that Your Art Beat will be present at Art Karlsruhe this year, one of the largest art fairs in Germany, and that we will be able to showcase all its facets there. On this occasion, we have also come up with something special. In addition to the booth on the Museumsmeile in Karlsruhe, there will also be a -virtual- booth online. At the moment, Your Art Beat is still working on the development of a first prototype – so I don’t want to anticipate anything at this point.

What does the future of YourArtBeat look like? – What can we expect?

The next big Your Art Beat event will be, as already mentioned, Art Karlsruhe (21 – 24 May 2021) and in parallel – as a “digital event” – the virtual exhibition booth online. This will also be the kick-off for our next Open Call, in which we are looking for the “third generation” of YAB artists whose works we will exhibit and sell at the YAB Market. Another project I am very excited about is “Blickwinkel” by Sophia Vecchini [link from Blickwinkel post]. As part of this social project, Sophia has turned homeless people into artists and let them shoot their own motifs with disposable cameras during the winter. We will soon be exhibiting a selection of these at the YAB Market and will be able to offer them exclusively. The proceeds will go in full to the artists.

What do you think are the characteristics of a good exhibition?

A good exhibition must “seduce” and “incite” me, it must have the potential to carry me away, even if the subject does not interest me at all. A good exhibition teaches me something without the feeling of learning. It shows me new perspectives and perspectives that make me reflect and question my opinion. In the best case, I not only take away factual knowledge from an exhibition, but also become more “emotionally intelligent” and learn something about the society I live in and about myself. Not every type of exhibition or exhibition theme offers the opportunity to fully exploit these possibilities, but it should have this claim. Small things can have a big impact.

The interview was conducted by Carsten Jan Weichelt.

Blickwinkel – by Sophia Vecchini

———— Filed under: Art ⁄⁄ Exhibition ⁄⁄ photography
Tagged with: // // // // // // //
Author:
Publ. 01.14.2021

Blickwinkel – by Sophia Vecchini
Turning homeless people into artists / let homeless people become artists

Sophia Vecchini is currently in her final semester of her media management studies. In her last semester she has to develop and realize a project on her own. The idea of her project to turn homeless people into artists* resulted in a course during her studies and her social vein. “I was in a volunteer course a few semesters ago. It was about creative campaigns, theoretically. The professor introduced us to one of the Bahnhofsmission am Zoo,” says Sophia. Here she received a lot of input. ” During this course we were allowed to think up creative campaigns for the Bahnhofsmission. My group and I had a very creative focus, a lot was about different art forms,” she continues.

That is when she had the idea to look for people who come to the Bahnhofsmission am Zoo as people who are homeless and let them become artists*. They should create art, taking photos from their point of view and everyday life. Photographs that will be presented at an exhibition afterwards. Now the time has finally come: the planning phase has already begun and the idea is being realized. In the first quarter of 2021, the exhibition is supposed to open in the homeless center of the Bahnhofsmission am Zoo. The exhibition is also intended to become a place of meetings and interaction. A place where worlds collide that are usually ignored by the broad mass of society. It is about the artists* showing themselves and being seen as well.

Every person is worth the same, every person deserves to be treated equally. Sophia takes the first step and invites you to join her creative process. In the following interview, she tells us how far she has progressed with planning so far and what difficulties, but also opportunities, have opened up for her.

How did you get the idea?

I am in the last semester of my media management studies. During this last semester we have to develop and realize a project independently. And fortunately, we have a lot of freedom there. I was in a volunteer course a few semesters ago. It was about creative campaigns and the professor connected us with one from the Bahnhofsmission am Zoo. He gave us input. We were allowed to come up with a creative campaign for the Bahnhofsmission during the course. That was when I got the idea to find people who would come to the Bahnhofsmission am Zoo as homeless people. Let them become artists themselves, so that they have the opportunity to show what they can do and be seen. That was catchy. I have a social vein and have worked a lot with children, but not so much in the area of poverty or homelessness. But once you’ve tasted a little bit of, I’d say, blood, and got into more social areas, then you have a drive like that. I did a voluntary social year in a crisis center. There you see an unbelievable amount and an unbelievable amount of formative things, also the view of our society and the problems are changing. It broadens your view of the world in which we are living. I grew up in Zehlendorf, I also went to school there. Somehow, the biggest dramas were that you could not afford the Longchamp bag. Sure, these are clichés, but some clichés are based on truths. And then you were dealing with sheltered people. To have such a contrasting program and to see that it is not always like that has influenced me and I have noticed that in such projects. When it came to developing creative campaigns… I often have a different view on it, because for me the human being and his story is more important than how successful we are now on Instagram. Which is of course not always optimal. But of course, it changes something.

Have homeless people been included in these creative campaigns, and have the campaigns been implemented?

Unfortunately, the campaigns were not implemented, it was more of a theoretical part. So it was more about the concept and the thought processes behind it. We were able to think about how much we really wanted to involve these people and how many and in what way, because there are still many points of contact. So as I just said, with people who live in a sheltered household. Not everyone in the course was so enthusiastic about the idea of sitting in a room with five homeless people.

If you want to work with a homeless person for your project, isn’t it possible that there is a lot of distrust? I imagine it’s difficult to convince people who are homeless for a project just like this.

I have to say that I have asked myself the same question. That is why I was quite fast at the point where I said: OK, I would like to work with the social workers there on site. With the individual case helpers on site, because they know their people and they know who might be interested. But I have to say that I spent a day as an assistant in the Bahnhofsmission am Zoo and you get a feeling for the ambience. For the tone that prevails there. And I went there once for an appointment, for example, I had an appointment with one of the social workers there and at the moment it’s very confusing where the entrance is. There was a group of men who said: what are you looking for? Do you need help? There was actually not much fear of contact from the other side. That’s why I’m relatively optimistic. I also went for a walk with a homeless man who helped me a bit and gave me some advice. The social worker there, with whom I am in contact, she told me very clearly whom I can already contact. Because it is a kind of network. You usually have a relatively regular clientele. Most of them are coming back again and again. That means that internal hierarchies are formed there and that means there are certain people who have more to say than others. From the outside, you don’t have a clue. But if you also have insiders and you get to know the people a little bit, get in touch with the right people, then you get such insights. I went for a walk with someone like that and he told me what could go well…, what could not go that well…, about what I have to pay attention to etc. I had the feeling that there is a lot more confidence in me than I would have thought.

How far have you progressed with the project, what is the current status?

There have been quite a few changes because of Corona. Corona makes everything more difficult. That means it was very, very difficult to find financing. But actually I am at the point where I have found someone who wants to finance the project – thanks to Freiberger & Collegen. Now I can buy the cameras I need for my project. I have to do everything relatively quickly with the clientele that I have to deal with. So from the moment I give the cameras to the 15 homeless people, so to speak, to the finished picture hanging on the wall. It can’ t take half a year. It must be a period of not more than two or three months. Three would almost be too much. Just to keep the 15 people in line. I have to prevent that it is simply lost in the life that the people lead. And the exhibition is only in March, because actually at this time, when winter comes, they have other problems. So they are really more concerned with getting through the winter and still being there next year. Beyond that I try to find further media partners. This is the phase I am in right now. So much planning – it’s just not the fun part yet.

How long do the people without shelter have the camera? In what period of time are you allowed to capture their view on things?

The plan is not really to say: Okay, it’s just one day. I just don’t want to make the time frame so tight, because I also really want to make them artists. I want to give them a chance, and creative freedom. If they can’t find inspiration in one place, they should be able to go to another. Just take their time for it.

How should the exhibition proceed?

I would like to address many different people, but the 15 artists will also be present at the opening. I think the exciting thing about the idea is that you can easily cover several things with it. Of course, it is exciting to participate in such a project and there are people who would simply do it voluntarily. But for many of them, there would be a little bit of a loan missing. That means you usually have to give them a financial incentive as well. In most projects they say that they will get vouchers from a supermarket. Because at least they can’t buy drugs with them. I personally prefer to give them self-responsibility. Of course I don’t want to support that, but I will say it in this way: a normal photographer could buy drugs as well, because he/she is free to decide how to spend the earned money. What matters here is really to treat them like artists. I don’t want to write on the picture or advertising for social reasons: We turn homeless people into artists. I want them to feel that way, too. I want them to feel valued. And another thing that I think is exciting is that when they are at this exhibition and they stand next to their pictures and say: Hey, do you want to buy my photograph? The plan is to let them decide the price for themselves first. Just to see how they rate themselves and what interested people would be willing to pay. Then automatically this confrontation between potential buyers and the people that this whole project is actually about happens. And I would like to see it happen in the center at the zoo. That’s exactly the meeting place to create a situation of talks and encounters.

You say that you would like to give the homeless people just that kind of courage. But I can imagine that you also have to give courage to the other side. So that they say: Okay, I’m going to face this now and I’m just going to get out of my bubble and take a look at it now. Maybe they are also afraid of it, because they don’t know how to act; how to interact with each other? Do you have something planned there, too?

These are good points. The Bahnhofsmission am Zoo is quite well hidden. That means it’s not super central in itself and it doesn’t happen very often that someone just happens to walk by by chance. That means you really have to advertise it more. Theoretically, the center is built in such a way that you have different rooms and can use them for different purposes. Universities or school classes can go there and ask questions. But there are also consultations for homeless people. My hope is that when you arrive there during regular activities, you will also experience life there. At the opening itself, it would be nice if the social workers were also present, because then the reports will be from different perspectives and you can interact with different people. In this way the possible “fear” on both sides is maybe reduced.

The interview was conducted by Carsten Jan Weichelt.

KMA Art Walk Video – Have a look

———— Filed under: Art
Tagged with: // // // // // //
Author:
Publ. 12.16.2020

In cooperation with the Berlin-based design studio Strollology, the ndi network of experts and the SRH University of Popular Arts (hdpk), a series of events was developed, the prelude to which was the Art Walk on popular Karl-Marx-Allee KMA Vision

Finally, the time has come. We are happy to proudly present our video of the KMA Art Walk here on Your Art Beat. So, what was the KMA Art Walk again? We have already told you about this event. Here you can read more about it. KMA Artwalk

Video and Composition by Lars Roth
KMA Song by Kaja Riedle & Paco Bose
Video Artwork by Linda Mögel

Stay healthy and see you soon!

Ai Sato

———— Filed under: Artist ⁄⁄ Artwork

Author:
Publ. 10.18.2020

In this post, Ai Sato talks about the creation of her works.

In order to create my art:digital drawing, finding the objects that have the potential to be a subject of interest is an essential factor for me, so I have been archiving the photographs of everyday life here in Mexico. Most of the findings are very different, and often are rather unexpected from my point of view: the nature, color, landscape, and architecture. These scenery became one of the important factors to my works as the impression of these subjects are quite strong, and have a strong visual presence.

I took the screenshot of a couple of digital drawings that I am currently working on in order to explain one of the processes of how I create the digital drawing: First, I start off by adjusting the snap-shot photograph (*on the left bottom) from the screenshot image, rather spontaneously. Expanding the possibilities of the colors, tweaking the shapes and changing the composition in order to experiment the possibility from these mere ordinal photography. Gradually transforming the image to the one above it at some point.

For this particular work, I started to become interested in creating “spheres”, which soon after I got the idea to “transfer” to the new “canvas”, because I found that there could be more possibilities in these objects to be a part of another drawing. To me, it is not so different to work with digital images with photoshop vs work physically with paint and canvas: “Randomness” is actually an important part of how I process making my art. Therefore, handling the colors on canvas, and handling the colors digitally work pretty fairly to me in order to achieve the visuals that I want to express.

I am also interested in creating moving images and video works with the same manner mentioned above. I am sharing one of the short video works I have recently created and experimented. One of my interests on this project is to expand the visual experiment, and playing with the possibilities beyond static images.

(*The photo in the screenshot was taken at the side street of central market, in San Cristobal de las Casas, Mexico, where I am currently residing. The short video footage was taken at Puerto Arista, on the north coast of Chiapas, Mexico in the municipality of Tonalá, combining with the other footage taken at home and garden.)

(*One of my recent digital drawing work, “Untitled”, was shown at Digital Arts Festival (ADAF), 16th international festival for digital arts, Athens, Greece, July-September 2020)

Exit Athena

———— Filed under: Art ⁄⁄ Artist ⁄⁄ Exhibition

Author:
Publ. 10.11.2020

From November 19, 2020 Selma’s solo exhibition Exit Athena can be seen at the Museum Folkwang in Essen. With her surreal-looking multimedia installations, Selma Köran questions traditional power structures and gender relations. For her first institutional exhibition, Exit Athena. the young artist has taken a canonical text of European culture and transformed it into an exuberant cinematic spectacle: Hesiod’s Theogony tells the story of the Greek deities. The artist adds a fictional final chapter to this text, in which she turns the hierarchy of the world of gods upside down. The heroine in Köran’s feminist new version is the wise and rebellious Athena, who competes against her own father Zeus. Selma Köran creates her alternative mythology in a visual language of exaggeration. She brings out the sensuality and aggressiveness in Hesiod’s cosmos and stages it in a colorful and anarchic way. The linear narrative structure of the text gives way to a fragmentary juxtaposition of grotesque film scenes and animated sequences with clay figures.

Selma has been part of the Your Art Beat network from the very beginning and took part in the accompanying program of events at the 2019 group exhibition in Berlin Kreuzberg as part of an “audiovisual dialogue”. She holds a Master’s degree of fine arts and design from the Dirty Art Department, Sandberg Institute Amsterdam.

The I Ballet

———— Filed under: Artist ⁄⁄ Artwork

Author:
Publ. 06.3.2020

“The I Ballet” by Martin Henkel
Description of the installation:
The entire installation was first visualized in a 3-D program to get an exact idea of the character of the installation. The procedure for designing in a 3-D program is based on vectors and surfaces and in this case on animation. The same procedure was used in reality and in material. That means, first a wireframe model was created in original size, then the whole thing was covered with clay and modeled. The resulting figure was then cast in plaster and taken taken out of the mould, animated or changed in shape, cast again and so on. From these negative moulds, reproductions made of paper were created and copied. Thus, a dance formation was created, called “The I Ballet”, since they all descended from one figure.
The figures themselves consist of an arm, an implied body and a head.

Meaning of the installation:
The implied body has something floating and flowing, in contrast to the arm, which symbolizes power and strength. In a figurative sense this means that processes and goals are not necessarily realizable despite one’s own will.
The small head stands for limited and – on itself – limited thinking.
The figures are captured moments of movement, such as frozen stages of a person’s life or efforts of self-fulfillment.
Placed on poles, with a thin cross-section, the figure has a flexible floor connection, but unstable grounding.
The movement efforts of this one multiple figure create an I ballet, a beautiful, active, but also absurd life form.

“Inselgalerie” – The everyday life of a gallery

———— Filed under: Art ⁄⁄ Artist ⁄⁄ Artwork ⁄⁄ Exhibition ⁄⁄ painting
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Author:
Publ. 04.14.2020

On my way to Inselgalerie in Friedrichshain, close to Frankfurter Tor, the area does not seem like a typical place where I would find a gallery. According to gallery director Eva Hübner, galleries must be located in every district of the city. “[…] This part of the Friedrichshain-Kreuzberg district has less cultural and creative offerings than, for example, the area around Warschauer Strasse, and as a result, there are not so many people who often go to galleries without fear of contact“, so Hübner. What does fear of contact mean? There is a certain fear of entering a gallery, but are somehow afraid to enter. I was one of them – but why? Perhaps because a visit to a gallery is not as anonymous as a visit to a museum? “Maybe, but I don’t exactly see it this way”, says Mrs. Hübner. “Inselgalerie” – The everyday life of a gallery weiterlesen

me.magritte – by Stefanie Rübensaal

———— Filed under: Art ⁄⁄ Digital ⁄⁄ photography
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Author:
Publ. 04.5.2020

Viva la Internet! Better said: Luckily there is Instagram. Corona makes it impossible for me to visit galleries at the moment. Thank God that Instagram is also a good platform for this because I’m looking there for artworks and video installations which I would like to share with you.

Today I present you: me.magritte – a video installation by Stefanie Rübensaal. Have a look at the video installation first and let it have an effect on you.

It is important for Stefanie Rübensaal to produce the idea for her video installation from out of the flow. ” Here it went very quickly from designing the graphic mask to photographing and installing the figure,” she writes to me. She spent a day by the sea to record the video and in the end “the work is a digital collage of all the elements,” she continues.

For me personally, the video work has something calming about it, but at the same time, it encourages me to think and reflect. There is something mysterious in it. Being at the sea and looking out to the open sea makes me melancholic sometimes. How do you feel about it?

Stefanie came up with the idea through “inner chaotic states” – in times of Corona a state that many people are experiencing. ” Standing still, emptiness, upheaval, change, transformation. Where are we going? A moment of stop and questioning”, she explains, “To see the sea, but not to be at the sea. To walk along the sea in your mind and at the same time holding on to the protection of the umbrella.” Also in the interpretation of dreams, the umbrella stands for protection and safety. A state of mind that many currently hope for.

Stefanie Rübensaal has a mixed relationship with video art: “On the one hand, I think a video is a cold working medium and product […]. On the other hand, videos (video collages) can be used to expand existing images and add an additional level of meaning to them. When this happens, I really enjoy the medium […]”, says Stefanie.

So if anyone would have liked to go to the seaside over Easter, this is a good alternative to explore the sea near to Rostock even when we are not allowed to travel actually.

Homepage Stefanie Rübensaal