Behind Your Art Beat – An Interview with Johanna Griebert

———— Filed under: Allgemein ⁄⁄ Art ⁄⁄ Artist ⁄⁄ Digital ⁄⁄ Market ⁄⁄ Processing

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Publ. 03.2.2021

Maybe you can think of [Your Art Beat] as a kind of virtual museum

It is the year 2016. In the beginning it is just an idea, but soon Your Art Beat e. V. grew out of it. Johanna Griebert has been involved from the beginning, and today we will introduce her. Johanna is the chairperson of the board of Your Art Beat, along with Matthias Welker. In the interview, we talk about the history of the association and what Your Art Beat stands for. The aim of the association is “to take a holistic view on the art, culture and creative scene and [to] dedicate itself to the protection, preservation, wide-ranging and multimedia presentation of the most diverse arts”, as Johanna says. The mission: cultural education. The main motif here is the combination of modern media technologies and interfaces of the analogue and digital world. ” Maybe you can think of [Your Art Beat] as a kind of virtual museum,” she pursues. Artists who are selected through open calls are exhibited. Their works can be bought on the Your Art Beat Market. What exactly the YAB Market is all about? What the future of YAB will look like? You can find out in the following interview. Johanna also explains why experimenting with digital media in particular is so exciting and which features should not be missing from a good exhibition.

How did the association Your Art Beat start and what are your tasks there?

I have been involved in Your Art Beat from the very beginning. In 2016, after the presentation of my final project, back then my professor, now good friend and colleague Matthias Welker approached me and described his initial ideas for a project. From the first moment, I was enthusiastic and quickly convinced that I wanted to get involved in the project. That was practically the birth of a project that later developed into Your Art Beat. My tasks were of a conceptual, curatorial, editorial and organisational nature. At the end of 2016, the project was online and half a year later, in the summer of 2017, we founded the YAB association, which I run together with Matthias as chairperson of the board.

How would you describe the association in a few sentences?

Your Art Beat e.V. is a non-profit association that takes a holistic view on the artistic, cultural and creative scene and is dedicated to the protection, preservation and wide-ranging, multimedia presentation of a wide variety of arts. We see our mission in cultural education and in this respect call for participatory events and “creative activism”. We want to conduct discourses at eye level and dissolve static role assignments of knowledge instructor, recipient and producer. “Isn’t everybody a creator and curator?” Furthermore, Your Art Beat explores the potentials of modern media technologies and the intersections of the analogue and the digital. This is a motif that can be found in various facets of Your Art Beat.

What goals have you set yourselves as an association? What does Your Art Beat stand for?

We see our function primarily in promoting artists and supporting them in their activities. To this end, we offer various services, which we put together according to orientation and objectives, in order to be able to respond to individual circumstances and requirements.
Our goal or vision is to develop a new tool (Your Art Beat Gallery), which is to be understood as a kind of immersive and multimedia knowledge repository, in which collectively generated knowledge, artistic experiences or creative processes are saved and designed as multimedia contributions. Perhaps one can imagine it as a kind of virtual museum, composed of content from society and intended to offer participation, information and pleasure at the same time. Like a museum, this collective art and creative memory should be accessible to the public.

What exactly is the Your Art Beat Market?

The YAB Market [Link YAB-Market] is a digital trading place dedicated exclusively to the buying and selling of artworks, with a focus on digital and media art. Here we also find “the typical YAB motif” that I spoke of earlier: The intersection of the analogue and the digital.
So the question is: how can you produce a digital work haptically or transfer it into a physical medium?
This primarily goes hand in hand with the challenge that for each work a suitable physical medium has to be found that reflects both the visual dimensional depth and the content component (“the soul” of the work). To this end, we have experimented with different materials, such as mirror glass, (normal) glass and aluminium. This allows us to offer individual products in different design and price variants.
Furthermore, we offer additional services that can be used individually. We offer clients our knowledge and professional background, roughly speaking: content-related, legal, financial, as well as logistical matters concerning private art objects.

How are the artists selected?

Every year we launch an open call in which we look for new and special talents. The 5-10 artists who convinced us the most will be presented at the YAB Market. In addition, a selection of their works is offered for sale. Within 3-4 weeks, artists and creative professionals from all over the world have the opportunity to apply with their portfolio. At the last Open Calls we got great feedback from different countries. The decisions are usually very difficult but the result is always a very meticulous and fine selection of new talents’ works. As I said before, there is a focus on media and digital art. However, in recent years, we have also been able to convince artists from more “classical” disciplines, which means that the Market can offer a refreshing diversity for sale.

Digital media – are they more a part of the independent cultural scene or have they already entered the realm of state institutions?

Digital media have also arrived in institutional exhibition venues, but in practice they are not as mature as one would expect, or wish. Nevertheless, it’s nice to see that the use of digital media is also becoming established in “traditional” or “conservative” institutions. – Of course, it always depends on how the respective exhibition house is set up and oriented. For many exhibitions, media stations etc. are not even necessary, e.g. pure art exhibitions. Either way, anyone who wants to use media in exhibitions should choose them sensibly, plan them carefully and implement them in an overall functional way.
A big challenge that I personally perceive in my job at the moment is the topic of accessibility. Especially when it comes to electronic media, there are a lot of things to consider when implementing digital applications – be it of a design, content or physical nature. It is not easy to reconcile all of these and achieve a beautiful, functional end product. I am very pleased that more attention is being paid to the topic of accessibility in the exhibition context and that it is establishing itself as an elementary component in the exhibition business – yet there is still a lot to learn on all sides.

What makes it so exciting to experiment with digital media?

What is exciting about digital media is that digital formats give us the possibilities to present and convey content in the most diverse ways. In other words, for every content you want to convey, there are different ways of preparing and presenting it. Digital media expand this spectrum and offer us further options for presenting and ultimately conveying content in its own individual and ideal way.

What is planned for Art Karlsruhe, how will YourArtBeat present itself?

We are very pleased that Your Art Beat will be present at Art Karlsruhe this year, one of the largest art fairs in Germany, and that we will be able to showcase all its facets there. On this occasion, we have also come up with something special. In addition to the booth on the Museumsmeile in Karlsruhe, there will also be a -virtual- booth online. At the moment, Your Art Beat is still working on the development of a first prototype – so I don’t want to anticipate anything at this point.

What does the future of YourArtBeat look like? – What can we expect?

The next big Your Art Beat event will be, as already mentioned, Art Karlsruhe (21 – 24 May 2021) and in parallel – as a “digital event” – the virtual exhibition booth online. This will also be the kick-off for our next Open Call, in which we are looking for the “third generation” of YAB artists whose works we will exhibit and sell at the YAB Market. Another project I am very excited about is “Blickwinkel” by Sophia Vecchini [link from Blickwinkel post]. As part of this social project, Sophia has turned homeless people into artists and let them shoot their own motifs with disposable cameras during the winter. We will soon be exhibiting a selection of these at the YAB Market and will be able to offer them exclusively. The proceeds will go in full to the artists.

What do you think are the characteristics of a good exhibition?

A good exhibition must “seduce” and “incite” me, it must have the potential to carry me away, even if the subject does not interest me at all. A good exhibition teaches me something without the feeling of learning. It shows me new perspectives and perspectives that make me reflect and question my opinion. In the best case, I not only take away factual knowledge from an exhibition, but also become more “emotionally intelligent” and learn something about the society I live in and about myself. Not every type of exhibition or exhibition theme offers the opportunity to fully exploit these possibilities, but it should have this claim. Small things can have a big impact.

The interview was conducted by Carsten Jan Weichelt.

Strollology

———— Filed under: Allgemein

Author:
Publ. 01.26.2021

The term Strollology translates as walking science and stems from the English term “to stroll” = to go for a walk). Together with his wife Anna, Lars Roth founded the design studio Strollology in 2014. In addition to commercial projects, the agency is also focused on artistic projects and theoretical aspects of design. “If you’re working only in the commercial field, you can easily feel like a hamster in a wheel. It’s good for creative work to constantly expand one’s own horizon,” says Lars Roth.
In August 2020, they were part of the Karl-Marx-Allee Artwalk in Berlin together with YOUR ART BEAT. There, they presented their project “KMA Faces”. Anna and Lars photographed residents of Karl-Marx-Allee and morphed their faces with the help of a machine learning model. This was done by a Generative Adversarial Network (an artificial neuronal network) that constantly generated new variants of the KMA residents from the portraits – a work of art that will probably exist only once. “There is actually nothing that doesn’t already exist,” says Lars Roth.
Thanks to artificial intelligence, however, this might change. How? Read the full interview and learn more about Strollology.

Who is behind Strollology?
My wife Anna and I are behind it. We both studied visual communication at Kunsthochschule Kassel. The Swiss sociologist and design theorist Lucius Burckhard, who invented Strollology, taught in Kassel. I’ve always found his work exciting. I’m all into conscious perception. And Burckhardt initiated walks with the aim of sharpening participants’ awareness for their environment and adopting new perspectives. Of course, that has a lot to do with vision. In our walks through Berlin we took up the idea of Burckhardt’s thoughts and carried them on. In our blog www.strollology.com we tackled the topic in theory. In addition, we cooperated with various partners, such as Slow Travel Berlin and the B_Tours Festival, who deal with walking as an artistic practice.
Beyond that, Strollology is about conscious perception of the environment – a constant analysis and reflection of what surrounds us. There are two things that have always interested us: people and places. And I believe that places have their own aura, that is, they convey a special feeling. We often walked through Neukölln. Neukölln is an old working-class district that has changed radically several times in the course of the last century. Our intention with these walks and with Strollology in general was to create an awareness of that among the visitors. To make people aware of the things that surround them every day.
Lucius Burckhardt’s design-theoretical reflections, however, go far beyond the actual “walk”; it is much more about constantly questioning one’s own point of view – according to the saying “think outside the box”. This attitude has also increasingly been integrated into our practical work as designers. The combination of applied projects and theoretical analysis, that is what characterises Strollology for us. For example, we are very interested in artificial intelligence. We deal with this in the commercial field on the one hand and in free artistic projects on the other one.

So one could say that you are exploring the business world in order to create something new artistically?
If you look at it philosophically, then I would answer that question with yes. Strollology is first and foremost the philosophy behind our work. We humans are practically filters. We perceive all day long, for example when we walk through the city or move through the net. Our input therefore also influences our output. In our commercial projects, we try to insert our artistic input and our theoretical background. In our everyday life, in the commercial field, a lot of our work is hands on, of course. A large part of our agency’s daily routine is determined by implementing specific projects according to our clients’ wishes. But behind that is always our philosophy – mirroring what we do in the commercial sector, for example, – to rethinking it artistically, and vice versa.

You mentioned that you offered walks at the time in order to consciously perceive the surroundings. How can one imagine that? How did you guide the visitors?
We confronted participants with their own perception: What do I perceive? If I perceive something, what can I do with it? One tour, for example, was about the perception of Kottbusser Damm. The tour followed the course of a typical 18th century Sunday walk: through Cottbusser Thor out of the city on a sandy avenue to the spacious meadows of Hasenheide. This narrative corresponds to what we archetypically understand by a picturesque landscape and would call “beautiful”. Nowadays, the city has spread far beyond the former city limits, and the former rural character of Kottbusser Damm has given way to a noisy, 6-lane road. The tour was as much about creating a sense for the historical dimension of the place in the participants as it was about questioning what we consider beautiful and why.

The interview was conducted by Carsten Jan Weichelt

KMA Artwalk

———— Filed under: Allgemein

Author:
Publ. 10.11.2020

In cooperation with the Berlin-based design studio Strollology, the ndi network of experts and the SRH University of Popular Arts (hdpk), a series of events was developed, the prelude to which was the Art Walk on popular Karl-Marx-Allee kma-vision.de
In the spirit of promoting civic and local political commitment and strengthening the neighbourhood community, people of all ages, backgrounds and interests were invited to spend an evening of art and culture on Karl-Marx-Allee.
The dramaturgy of the rally was accompanied by elements of storytelling and a live program. Among other things, there were short story readings, screenings and also a fashion walk by local fashion designers. Further stations addressed the backgrounds and history of the site and recounted them in the form of musical interpretations, short films, personal stories and a quiz.
One of the highlights of the Art Walk was the Art Screening “KMA Faces” (by Strollology) in front of the Computer Games Museum. For this work, 30 inhabitants of the KMA were photographed. Their portraits were morphed with the help of a machine learning model and generated by an artificial neural network to constantly changing variants of the KMA residents. With this artistic work, the Design Studio not only wants to reflect and demonstrate the fluctuation and urban changes of the KMA. It also intends to sensitize residents to their responsibility and influence on the streets around the KMA and to make them feel part of a community (both visually and mentally) that will shape the future of the KMA. This project is characterized not only by its technical standards and artistic component, but also by its social approach, which promotes an awareness of collectivity and local political commitment.
Inga Lieckfeldt from SYLD store participated with a wonderfully unconventional fashion show format à la Berlin style – a kind of modern fashion walk, directly at the Computer Games Museum. The aim was to provide space and attention for creativity, especially local and sustainable fashion.
In contrast to well-known fashion presentations and tiring beauty ideals, the fashion was presented by Berlin designers themselves and by people from real life, beyond the conventional model norm. The goal: as colorful and diverse as possible. Beyond that, joy, showing emotions and having fun. The lively and colorful Fashion Walk was accompanied by Berlin Female DJ Diana May. https://www.facebook.com/SYLDSTORE/

Von Pinguinen und Drachen – PODCAST

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Publ. 03.26.2020

Hallo allerseits,

Jetzt wo wir alle zu Hause (#stayhome) sind, möchte ich euch auf meinen Podcast „Von Pinguinen und Drachen“ aufmerksam machen. Zusammen mit Jo Döling, habe ich Anfang des Jahres die erste Episode des Podcast produziert. Noch bis zum 31. März werden die Klicks bzw. Zuhörer und Zuhörerinnen gezählt. Wenn wir genügend Klicks haben, werden wir bei dem Radiosender Antenne Bayern unter Vertrag genommen, der uns neben einem Preisgeld fünf weitere Episoden ermöglicht.

Worum geht’s in „Von Pinguinen und Drachen?“

Pinguine sind verpeilt, lustig und extrovertiert. Schließlich watscheln sie den ganzen Tag lang mit ihren Artgenossen zusammen auf Eisschollen herum. Drachen sind stark, schlau und introvertiert. Warum sollten sie sonst die ganze Zeit allein in Höhlen rumhocken? Klischees und Stereotype gibt es überall. Besonders in Romanen und literarischen Texten. Was es im Detail mit diesem Problem auf sich hat, wollen Jo und ich in unserem Podcast herausfinden. „Von Pinguinen & Drachen“ ist ein literarischer Podcast über Gender Studies und Unterschiede zwischen den Geschlechtern, der sich selbst nicht immer bierernst nimmt. Interviews mit Professoren, Autoren, aber auch spontane Gespräche auf der Straße, sowie interaktive Spieleinlagen ergeben ein buntes Misch-Masch an Vorurteilen, Meinungen und Anekdoten.

In der ersten Folge reden Jo und ich über eines der erfolgreichsten Bücher schlecht hin, nämlich Harry Potter und der Orden des Phönix von J.K. Rowling. Die These der ersten Folge „Bedient sich J.K. Rowling an stereotypischen Bildern bzw. Vorurteilen?“ belegen wir anhand von Textauszügen, die wir vorlesen und danach genauer analysieren. Mit angenehm satirischem Touch kommen wir dem Problem von J.K. Rowlings Figurenzeichnung auf die Spur. Dazu fragen wir Berni Mayer (Autor), wie er beim Schreiben mit Stereotypen vorgeht, um einen Einblick in den Schaffensprozess zu erhalten. Mit Spiel, Spaß und Musik wird der Hörer in das Themengebiet literarische Stereotypen und Vorurteile entführt.

Anhören könnt ihr euch den Podcast auf Spotify, Deezer, Apple Podcast oder über die lautgut Homepage.

Von Pinguinen und Drachen – Podcast Spotify

Von Pinguinen und Drachen – Podcast Deezer

Von Pinguinen und Drachen – Podcast Apple Podcast

Von Pinguinen und Drachen – Podcast Lautgut

Wir würden uns über eure Unterstützung sehr freuen.
Passt auf euch auf, bleibt gesund und bis nächste Woche!

Liebe Grüße
Carsten

Hi, I’m Carsten!

———— Filed under: Allgemein ⁄⁄ Artist ⁄⁄ creative writing ⁄⁄ real
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Publ. 02.13.2020

It’s not just a new year, here is also a new person writing for you. Who am I? I’m Carsten.
I’m studying creative writing in Berlin. Since I can think, I have been interested in different forms of art. At the age of five, I started acting, making music and singing. Before I moved to Berlin in 2018, I had trained to be an actor in Cologne for two years. Besides creative studies, I also tried out other courses of study such as business administration, media management, art and political science. But my creative streak won. Luckily.

For me, life is art with many different stories. So, art is life for me, too; and every person in this big city has their own story and individual life. Art has this as well: individualism. Art can be created or presented in so many ways, maybe even in ways, we don’t know yet. However, if I don’t like it sometimes, I’m still totally fine with it because it’s just my personal opinion and art doesn’t have to affect or impress everyone in the same way.

But what is it that fascinates me so much about all these art forms? I am interested in old but also modern art. Thanks to new technology and a lot of creative people, so many things are possible today and the process is still going on. You never know what will come next. I find that incredibly exciting and interesting. I would like to tell you the stories that move me and catch my eye and which I think are important to be told. Not only does Art embody fantasy but also society and social problems. It can be inspiring, political, arousing and enlightening.

Art offers space for discussion – today this is more important than ever. Why is that? In my opinion, fewer and fewer different opinions are accepted; instead, black and white attitudes towards things increase. Society is splitting up. Maybe art, in whichever form, can help here and remind us of talking and listening to each other.

But it’s not just art people want to get to know and see in this time – they are willing to listen to and read interesting and good stories, too. Here I am: I will find both for you.

Let’s start with art!

 

Nora Bork -The Lady with the Ermine

———— Filed under: Allgemein ⁄⁄ Art ⁄⁄ Artist ⁄⁄ Artwork ⁄⁄ Design ⁄⁄ Digital ⁄⁄ painting ⁄⁄ real ⁄⁄ Uncategorized
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Publ. 07.3.2019

The Lady with the Ermine is one of -in total- four women portraits of Leonardo DaVinci and got produced during the years of 1488 and 1490.The young woman you see is Cecilia Gallerani, mistress of the former duke of Milan. But this has never been her only role – she was well known as one of the most beautiful and talented poets of her time.

Originally, this piece of art was a remittance work, which the Duke wanted to get produced.

…But there is still the question of  what is has to do with the ermine on the woman’s arm.?! – Actually, Leonardo DaVinci clearly and specifically alludes to the duke, whose nickname was The White Ermine.

To let you face Cecilia’s smile, producer Nora Bork was using the stop-motion technique.

Stop Motion Animation is a technique used in animation to bring static objects to life on screen. This is done by moving the object in increments while filming a frame per increment. When all the frames are played in sequence it shows movement.

Nora Borks’ video is a nice example of how mediatization and technization can be used to bring us closer to artworks. In this case, it is about the creation of a new possibility to directly interact with the art piece. This new access is in addition a clever way to trigger the viewers mind and let him create stories about this mystical young woman with the Ermine on her arm.

YOUR ART BEAT MEETS MUSIC

———— Filed under: Allgemein ⁄⁄ Artwork ⁄⁄ Exhibition

Author:
Publ. 04.5.2019

Kühlspot Social Club is a venue for creative music, theatre, art and culture in Berlin Weissensee. They emphasize “social” in their perspective on cultural development and try to promote an inspiring community of artists and art lovers. In the field of music, the main focus is on improvised music, jazz, dance music of all kinds, including improvised dance music, tango, balfolk, and everything always live. In the course of the season – there is a break in late summer and in winter – they have one to three events per week, two to four art exhibitions per year and occasional dance parties. Performance art, theatre events, and action painting with improvised music are also part of the spectrum of the program. The room can accommodate up to 70 people.
Kühlspot is the former studio of the Berlin artist Siegfried Kühl, who died in 2016. His son, the artist Christoph Kühl, runs the Kühlspot. The art of Siegfried Kühl is permanently exhibited and contributes essentially to the great ambiance.
For more information see www.kuehlspot.com/kalender.html
YOUR ART BEAT is happy to be part of the Kühlspot community and exhibit some of its artists, among them Christoph Kühl.

Group exhibition of YOUR ART BEAT artists

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Author:
Publ. 03.6.2019

Where the digital becomes physical: Galerie Salon Halit Art in Berlin-Kreuzberg presented artists of YOUR ART BEAT, February 14 through 28, 2019
The group exhibition displayed a selection of artworks of some of YOUR ART BEAT’s unique and versatile international artists. For the prints, different materials were used such as glass and aluminium, but also FineArt Paper.
The visual artist Lita Poliakova (Life Is Torturing Awesome) portrays mental and physical transfiguration and recycles paper agents in order to catalyse the novelty. Her digital collages were printed on glass. She also presented a video on the creation of her work.

Dryden Roesch is an artist and graphic designer from Edmonton, Canada. Most of his recent work depicts architectural environments in vibrant and surreal ways to create an imagined (and sometimes disorienting) sense of place.

Sonia Bensouda is exploring the notions of time and space. She is an Interior Architect and Collage artist. Through digital collage and photography, she intends to explore the notions of Time and Space in the Urban environment. Her digital collages with old photography are printed on FineArt Paper.

Natalia Poniatowska is swinging between the digital and analogue photography, still and moving image. Project White is her investigation into the notion of absence of colour. She wanted to investigate what happens when we take out the colour of food. She painted the fruits white and they became completely new objects that are no longer associated with food and taste. She wants to make others notice how beautiful our senses are.

The London-based photographer Imogen Davis believes that photography is used to capture moments of peoples’ lives, moments that would otherwise be lost in our memories forever. For MY BREATH she learnt how to blow her own glass, making physical recreations of her breath that now have memories of their own. The MY BREATH series I-X was printed on glass.

Christoph Kühl’s works are almost exclusively collages, i.e. they are made of painted paper by using various techniques. The viewer is taken on a journey through three-dimensional spaces. Christoph’s collages are the projection surface of these sensational sites. Found image pieces are put together to convey new impressions.

Renate Marschner (1953-1990) was an artist from Lower Saxony and worked as a painter and broadcasting author in Berlin, Karlsruhe, and Switzerland. She has displayed her works in Berlin, Heidelberg, and New York. Her works deal with the issue of getting used to understanding things we don’t see.

For Zsolt Gyarmati, Art is Confrontation. The objective of his art is some sort of status report. Art should make people conscious of unconscious things. He showed the video DIOXINDAUER in Berlin.

Selma Köran (video) and Jonathan Rosenberg (music) have created an audiovisual dialogue with Renate Marschner that was shown for the first time. It is based on Renate Marschner’s drawing SPERRUNG (BLOCKING), oil chalk on school board lacquer. Selma Köran made a stop motion film with knead and Jonathan set it to music.

Lita, Dryden, and Christoph attended the opening of the exhibition. Thank you for this.